Note:

  • This is a longer module. Allocate yourself several hours/days to complete all steps.

  • Use your tablet/mobile device to use ForeFlight as you follow along. This module is not optimized for mobile use, you will need to use a computer with a screen.

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  • Required reading for this module:

    • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 12 - Weather Theory

    • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 13 - Aviation Weather Services 

    • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 15 - Navigation​

    • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 16 - Airspace

1.

  • Cross Country Flight: For a student pilot, the definition of a Cross Country Flight is a flight from one airport to another where navigation is used. During initial training, for a Cross Country to count toward your training, it must be at least 50nm.

  • The following will need to be completed per the FAA before you will take your checkride:

    • 3 hours of cross country flight training in a single engine airplane;

    • 3 hours of night flight training in a single engine airplane, that includes at least:

      • a) 1 cross country flight of over 100 nm total distance

    • 5 hours of solo cross country flying;

    • 1 solo cross country flight of at least 150nm total distance with full stop landings at 3 points and one segment of at least 50nm between T/O and landings; and

    • 3 T/O’s and landings to a full stop at an airport with an operating control tower.

  • To start, we will plan a cross country flight together.  The requirement is at least 50nm from KAZO. 

    • Examples include: 

      • KMKG

      • KARB

      • KMGC 

  • There is not maximum allowed amount of distance. Some students like to use the cross country flight to fly somewhere they are interested in, or somewhere to meet someone they know, etc. 

    • Examples of fun cross country destinations are:​

      • Mackinaw Island​

      • Burke Lakefront Cleveland

      • Traverse City

  • You will choose the airport you would like to fly to and plan a cross country flight that we will fly.​

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2.

  • Plan the Cross-Country Flight and Route:

    • Read:

      • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 15 - Navigation​

      • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 16 - Airspace

  • Follow along the video below by ForeFlight to plan your cross country flight route using your ForeFlight App. 

  • You will bring the flight plan as well as any other information you establish to the cross country flight lesson. 

3.

Aviation Weather:

Read​

  • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 12 - Weather Theory

  • Now that we have established our flight plan, how does the weather effect our route?

  • A major part of every cross country flight plan is evaluating the weather and knowing every possibility of wether phenomena that might effect our route.  

  • The following video explains the basics of weather and why it matters to us as pilots:

4.

Aviation Weather Services:

Read​

  • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chapter 13 - Aviation Weather Services 

  • Once we understand how weather effects our flight and what type of weather to aware of, we must understand the tools that are available to evaluate the weather before our flight.  

  • There are many resources a pilot can use for pre-flight weather evaluation including:

    • ForeFlight​

    • AviationWeather.Gov

    • Briefings

  • ForeFlight is highly recommended for pre-flight weather evaluation

  • ForeFlight allows the user to overlay weather observation tools over the flight route.

  • The following video shows how to use those tools:

  • Finally, a weather briefing should always be completed prior to any flight, especially a long cross country flight

  • The briefing, preferably done on ForeFlight as shown in the following video, provides the pilot with detailed weather effecting the proposed route.